Looking inside 18th Century Ivory Mannequins

Duke’s Shared Materials Instrumentation Facility (SMIF) is working with conservationists at Rubenstein Library to carefully image anatomical models that have been housed behind glass since the 1950s. Once the original has been scanned, researchers use a 3D printer to create a plastic replica. The model can be handled to prevent damage to the original. To learn more, visit the recent news feature or watch the video describing the process.

Girls STEM Day @ Duke Fuels the STEM Pipeline

On Saturday, May 19th, Girl Scouts and their families traveled to Duke University to learn from and work with over 100 women in STEM careers across the Triangle. Girl Scouts earned badges in digital photography, forensics, and robotics through a variety of different activities including use of SMIF’s scanning electron microscope. In a parallel parents forum, female STEM professionals, high school college counselors and university admissions counselors engaged parents and troop leaders in interactive panel discussions. To learn more about the event and see more photos, read Duke’s News Release.

Participants earning the digital photography badge were charged with imaging samples that they collected with both light and electron microscopes. These ranged from a flower petal (below image top) to a bagel (below image bottom).

 

 

Making Metamaterials a Household Name

Metamaterials are artificially structured materials used to control and manipulate light, sound, and many other physical phenomena. They became famous for their use in the creation of an “invisibility cloak”. A recent article in Duke Stories describes the history of metamaterials development and how researchers at Duke are striving to make them a household name. Read more here.

Silver nanocubes for multispectral imaging and printing

Researchers at Duke University recently published a paper in Advanced Materials describing the development of a technique to detect light across the electromagnetic spectrum. As opposed to using materials that absorb specific wavelengths of light, silver nanocube structures trap different types of light. This can be controlled by changing the size and arrangement of the nanocubes. To learn more see the Duke press release or read the article.

Toward Multispectral Imaging with Colloidal Metasurface Pixels
Jon W. Stewart, Gleb M. Akselrod, David R. Smith, and Maiken H. Mikkelsen

Abstract: Multispectral colloidal metasurfaces are fabricated that exhibit greater than 85% absorption and ≈100 nm linewidths by patterning film-coupled nanocubes in pixels using a fusion of bottom-up and top-down fabrication techniques over wafer-scale areas. With this technique, the authors realize a multispectral pixel array consisting of six resonances between 580 and 1125 nm and reconstruct an RGB image with 9261 color combinations.