Quantifying Exposure to Engineered Nanomaterials from Manufactured Products (QEEN II) Workshop

Environmental, health, and safety (EHS) research continues to push the boundaries in characterizing and quantifying human and environmental exposures to engineered nanomaterials from manufactured products. The 2nd Quantifying Exposure to Engineered Nanomaterials from Manufactured Products (QEEN II) Workshop highlights new research on the tools and methods available to characterize and quantify effective population exposures, as well as the presence and release potential of nanomaterials. This two-day technical workshop builds on key themes that emerged from the first QEEN workshop in 2015. The QEEN II program will address the progress in integrating exposure, hazard, and risk to reduce uncertainties in nanomaterial EHS assessments. The workshop goals also include the identification of priorities and options for cross-disciplinary research collaborations. The intended audience includes academics, Federal representatives, and manufacturers and distributors of nanotechnology-enabled products, as well as communities seeking to understand exposure science related to engineered nanomaterials.

Registration: This workshop is free and open to the public with registration on a first-come, first-served basis. Registration will be capped at 180 attendees. Registration will open on July 9, 2018.

Graduate Student and Postdoc Travel Support: The organizing committee is pleased to provide travel assistance for a limited number of graduate students and postdoctoral associates to attend the meeting. More information is available here.

Questions? Email us at QEEN2workshop@nnco.nano.gov.

RTNN Researchers Headline RTP180 Event

Last week, three RTNN faculty members highlighted the monthly RTP 180° event: Tori Miller (NC State), Daphne Klotsa (UNC), and Claudia Gunsch (Duke). RTP 180° is held at The Frontier and features people from triangle universities, local companies, and the community at-large who take the stage to speak passionately about what matters to them. Drs. Miller, Klotsa, and Gunsch related their work in nano to a packed house. Dr. Klotsa kicked off the evening, highlighting her work in modeling nanoparticle packing. Dr. Gunsch emphasized the importance in studying the unintended effects of silver nanoparticles in the environment. Dr. Miller closed the evening talks, giving an overview of her work in metallurgy.

If you missed the opportunity to see the event live, you can see a recording of the event here.