RTNN Researchers Develop Nanocrystal Factories for Quantum Dot Manufacturing

NC State researchers are now using a microfluidic system to create quantum dots across the visible light spectrum. The use of microfluidics significantly reduces manufacturing costs and enables real-time process monitoring. Quantum dots can be used in a variety of applications including LED displays and solar energy. For more information, visit the NC State News Release or the original paper in Advanced Functional Materials (details below).

“Facile Room Temperature Anion Exchange Reactions of Inorganic Perovskite Quantum Dots Enabled by a Modular Microfluidic Platform”

Authors: Kameel Abdel-Latif, Robert W. Epps, Corwin B. Kerr, Christopher M. Papa, Felix N. Castellano and Milad Abolhasani, North Carolina State University

Published: March 15, Advanced Functional Materials

Abstract: In an effort to produce the materials of next-generation photoelectronic devices, post-synthesis halide exchange reactions of perovskite quantum dots have been explored to achieve enhanced band-gap tunability. However, comprehensive understanding of the multifaceted halide exchange reactions has been inhibited by their vast relevant parameter space and complex reaction network. In this work, we present a facile room temperature strategy for rapid halide exchange of inorganic perovskite quantum dots. We provide a comprehensive understanding of the halide exchange reactions by isolating reaction kinetics from precursor mixing rates utilizing a modular microfluidic platform, QDExer (Quantum Dot Exchanger). We illustrate the effects of ligand composition and halide salt source on the rate and extent of the halide exchange reactions. Our fluidic platform offers a unique time- and material-efficient approach for studies of solution phase-processed colloidal nanocrystals beyond those studied here and may accelerate the discovery and optimization of next-generation materials for energy technologies.

Quantifying Exposure to Engineered Nanomaterials from Manufactured Products (QEEN II) Workshop

Environmental, health, and safety (EHS) research continues to push the boundaries in characterizing and quantifying human and environmental exposures to engineered nanomaterials from manufactured products. The 2nd Quantifying Exposure to Engineered Nanomaterials from Manufactured Products (QEEN II) Workshop highlights new research on the tools and methods available to characterize and quantify effective population exposures, as well as the presence and release potential of nanomaterials. This two-day technical workshop builds on key themes that emerged from the first QEEN workshop in 2015. The QEEN II program will address the progress in integrating exposure, hazard, and risk to reduce uncertainties in nanomaterial EHS assessments. The workshop goals also include the identification of priorities and options for cross-disciplinary research collaborations. The intended audience includes academics, Federal representatives, and manufacturers and distributors of nanotechnology-enabled products, as well as communities seeking to understand exposure science related to engineered nanomaterials.

Registration: This workshop is free and open to the public with registration on a first-come, first-served basis. Registration will be capped at 180 attendees. Registration will open on July 9, 2018.

Graduate Student and Postdoc Travel Support: The organizing committee is pleased to provide travel assistance for a limited number of graduate students and postdoctoral associates to attend the meeting. More information is available here.

Questions? Email us at QEEN2workshop@nnco.nano.gov.

Webinar: Technology Pathways Toward Commercializing Nanotechnology

This webinar will focus on quality control in the manufacturing process and builds on the National Nanotechnology Initiative’s Technology Pathways workshop held in November 2017. Webinar panelists will engage in a dialogue about the importance of and issues surrounding quality control in the production of nanomaterials. NNCO Director, Dr. Lisa Friedersdorf, will moderate the discussion.

Panelists will open the webinar with a brief overview of their experiences, successes, and challenges in ensuring the quality of manufactured nanomaterials. These remarks will be followed by a Q&A period. Questions for the panelists can be submitted to webinar@nnco.nano.gov from now through the end of the webinar at 11:30 AM on September 19, 2018.

Panelists:

  • Katherine Barton (Director of Production and Laboratory Operations, Nano-C, Westwood, MA)
  • Doug Singer (Executive Vice President of Manufacturing, Cerion Advanced Materials, Rochester, NY)

This webinar is free and open to the public with registration on a first-come, first-served basis. Registration is now open and will be capped at 500. Register here.

To learn more about the event, please visit the event website.