Carolina Science Symposium

The Carolina Science Symposium (CSS) is expected to draw about 100 participants, both locally and from the surrounding region. Topics in materials science, processing, characterization, and biomaterials will be presented by both invited and selected student contributors. A student poster session will be held, and 3-4 student contributed papers will be selected for 15 minute oral presentations. When registering, you will be asked to indicate whether the abstract should be considered for a poster or for a talk (eligible for an oral presentation). Over $2,000 will be awarded in prizes and drawings. The abstract deadline is November 1More information can be found here.

Invited Talks:


There will also be several free events leading up to the symposium. Please register for those that interest you!


Bio Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) Workshop – November 6, 2019


Bio-Indentation Workshop – November 6-7, 2019

NC State’s Analytical Instrumentation Facility (AIF) and Optics11 are hosting a workshop focused on mechanical characterization of biological and soft materials through nanoindentation. The workshop will include a brief background presentation as well as a demonstration of the Optics11 Piuma system. Attendees are encouraged to bring their own samples to try testing with the Piuma system as long as time permits.


Atom Probe Tomography – November 7, 2019

This technical seminar on Atom Probe Tomography for 3D Atomic-Scale Characterization will be hosted by CAMECA Instruments. Atom Probe Tomography (APT) is the highest special resolution analytical characterization technique with high efficiency single atom detection for quantitative atom scale 3D compositional analysis and elemental mapping of chemical heterogeneities. This talk will cover APT operational theory, an introduction to sample prep and data reconstruction, and an overview of various applications. A commercial cryo-UHV solution for FIB-APT specimen transfer will also be presented which expands the application space for APT to biological materials, hydrogen containing materials, and surfaces prone to rapid oxidation.

The seminar will begin at 11 am. Lunch will be provided


Bio-Microscopy Workshop – November 7, 2019 – 2:30-5 pm

Keyence is hosting a workshop focused on optical microscopy and fluorescence imaging of biological materials using their BZ-X800 microscope. Attendees are encouraged to bring their own samples to try imaging on the microscope.


CSS Professional Development Event – November 7, 2019 – 6-8 pm

The purpose of the event is to provide an additional professional development opportunity for attendees of the Carolina Science Symposium and foster collaboration between local universities. In addition, attendees can explore different types of careers and get advice and guidance from professionals in industry, government, academia, and non-profits. The event will last for ~2 hours with a mix of informal and formal networking. There will also be opportunities for one-on-one resume review and interview practice. Each attendee will receive a booklet with the names, contact information, and brief bio of participants. To register for the event, please fill out the Registration Form by Friday, November 1st. For questions/concerns, please contact Maude Cuchiara (maude_cuchiara@ncsu.edu).

Location: Tobacco Road Sports Cafe, Raleigh, NC

Accepting Nominations for 2019 RTNN Awards

Nominations are now open for the 2019 RTNN Awards. These awards serve to recognize researchers conducting collaborative research across the network as well as students who have devoted their time and energy to education and outreach activities. All nominations are due by Friday, September 27th. Please contact rtnanonetwork@ncsu.edu with any questions. Visit the RTNN Awards Website for more details.

Carolina Science Symposium

The Analytical Instrumentation Facility (AIF) is pleased to continue as host of the Carolina Science Symposium (formerly the Materials Research Society (MRS), ASM International, and American Vacuum Society (AVS) joint symposium. The meeting is expected to draw about 100 participants, both locally and from the surrounding region. Topics in materials science, processing, characterization, and biomaterials will be presented by both invited and selected student contributorsA student poster session will be held, and 3 student contributed papers will be selected for 15 minute oral presentations. When registering, you will be asked to indicate whether the abstract should be considered for a poster or for a talk (eligible for an oral presentation). Over $1000 will be awarded to the best student oral presentation and top 3 poster presentations. The abstract deadline is November 3For more information and to register, please visit the Carolina Science Symposium website.

MRS / ASM / AVS Joint Symposium

The Analytical Instrumentation Facility (AIF) is pleased to continue as host of the annual joint research symposium between the North Carolina Section of the Materials Research Society (MRS), Carolinas Central Chapter of ASM International, and Mid-Atlantic Chapter of American Vacuum Society (AVS). The meeting is expected to draw about 100 participants, both locally and from the surrounding region. Topics in materials science, processing, characterization, and biomaterials will be presented by both invited and selected student contributors.  A student poster session will also be held in the afternoon.

Materials Science in Caribbean Art and Archaeology: Two Case Studies

Prof MartinezThe Research Triangle Nanotechnology Network is excited to announce an upcoming seminar by Professor Antonio Martínez-Collazo. Professor Martínez joins us from the Physics Department at the University of Puerto Rico. He will present his work using materials characterization techniques to study works of art and archaeological artifacts. Following the talk, the Analytical Instrumentation Facility (AIF) at NC State will host tours for interested attendees to learn more about available characterization techniques and instrumentation.

Click here to register for a tour. Questions can be directed to rtnanonetwork@ncsu.edu.

Parking information: There are Centennial Campus pay-by-space parking spots available in the Poulton Deck and Partners Way Deck. More information about parking at NC State can be found here.

Seminar Abstract:

In recent years, materials science characterization techniques have been increasingly applied in the study of works of art and archaeological artifacts.  These studies have been geared to inform the efforts of art historians and conservators in order to obtain a better understanding of the degradation processes that occur in art pieces, to establish the palette and practices of particular artists, and to aid in forensic efforts to identify forgeries and fakes.  In archaeology, materials characterization techniques have been used in the interrogation of archaeological artifacts in order to derive information about the individuals who originally fabricated them and their communities.  This talk will report on two such applications.

madonnaFirst, we will consider a study involving image acquisition techniques and x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy to a painting by José Campeche y Rivafrecha, one of the first and most important Puerto Rican painters of the18th century.  The oil-over-wood- panel painting, known as “La Virgen de Belén” or Bethlehem’s Madonna, portrays a nursing Madonna and child scene.  Campeche executed a large number of paintings with very similar compositions, i.e showing the female figure nursing a child with her breast exposed with the unique exception of the painting studied in this work.   Puerto Rican art historians have speculated that this was a result of a posterior intervention.  Grazing angle visible images, as well as, infrared reflectography taken with Si- (940 nm) and InGaAs- (< 1.7 μm) based cameras and x-ray images of the painting were obtained in order to establish this possibility.  Images in the visible taken at a low grazing angle established the presence a paint overlayer in the suspect area.  Reflectance infrared images and transmission x-ray images confirmed their presence.  X-ray fluorescence analysis was performed in the intervened area and in similar chromatic fields elsewhere in the painting.  The obtained spectra indicate that the pigments used in the intervened area are the same as those used elsewhere in the painting.

2015-06-11 10.49.28Second, we will report on the application of Raman and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy to the identification of pigments in pre-Columbian (250 A.C. – 600 D.C.) Caribbean ceramics.  The results shed light on a controversy among Caribbean archaeologists: one group argues that the pieces were produced by two different aborigine cultures (Huecoide and Saladoide) versus those who propose that they belong the same culture. Our results, particularly those derived from the study of white pigments in decorated ceramic sherds, supports the two-different-culture hypothesis as two distinct pigments is suggested: kaolinite and calcium carbonate.