Week 1: Get to know a housefly

This week in RTNN Take-out Science, we’ll be exploring the housefly. Join us live on Tuesday, March 31st at noon to see the microscopes in action. If you have any questions, please send them to us at rtnanonetwork@ncsu.edu. During the show you can also ask questions in the comments section below or via Twitter (@RTNNsocial).

If you’d like to learn more about houseflies, visit these sites:

Announcing Take-out Science, Tuesdays at noon (ET)

RTNN is pleased to announce a weekly microscopy program for your quarantined viewing pleasure. Take-out Science will begin Tuesday, March 31st. Each week, Dr. Holly Leddy (SMIF at Duke), will explore a different theme using both a light microscope, a portable scanning electron microscope, and the support of RTNN technical staff. We’ll broadcast all sessions live and answer your questions. All shows will be posted here.

All shows are designed with K-12 audiences in mind and are open to everyone. Join us for some take-out science as we explore the world at a much smaller scale. (And don’t forget your take-out lunch!)

To learn more, please visit the Take-Out Science site.

Grad Student Opportunity: Science Outside the Lab

Science Outside the Lab” brings a small cohort of graduate student scientists and engineers to Washington, D.C. to explore the relationships among science, innovation, policy, and societal outcomes. This customized¬†free¬†one-week version (May 31 – June 6, 2020), sponsored by the Nanotechnology Collaborative Infrastructure Southwest (NCI-SW), will investigate the context of nanotechnology decision-making in government and business at the local, state, federal, and international levels. During the week-long workshop participants meet and interact with groups of people who fund, regulate, shape, critique, publicize, and study nanotechnology and other emerging technologies. This includes people like congressional staffers, lobbyists, funding agency officers, regulators, journalists, academics, museum curators, and others.

To apply to the program, complete this application. Application deadline: February 28, 2020.

For more information, please see the program website.

Congrats to our Image Contest Winners

A big thank you to everyone who submitted an image in the 2019 Image Competition. We are excited to announce the winners. Please vote for these amazing images in the NNCI Image Contest, There’s Plenty of Beauty at the Bottom. Voting will open on October 7th!

Most Stunning

Gill raker of the Japanese medaka

Melissa Chernick, Duke University

This image shows a portion of a gill raker from a Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes), a small fish often used as a research model. Gill rakers are tooth-like structures inside a fish that help capture prey and prevent damage to its gills. The image shows some of the tissue that makes up the gill raker: a taste bud surrounded by pavement cells.

Most Unique Capability

Nanocoined Structures in Diamond

Nichole Miller, Smart Material Solutions, Inc.

This image shows hierarchical features that were milled into diamond using a focused ion beam. This patented process, “Nanocoining,” can seamlessly nanopattern drum molds for roll-to-roll manufacturing hundreds of times faster than competing technologies. This enables nanopatterning that was previously feasible for only small, academic experiments to be applied on the industrial scale. Nanocoining opens the door for nanostructured surfaces with unique optical and wetting properties to be applied to a variety of commercial products including OLEDs, biosensors, wire-grid polarizers, solar panels, and windows.

Most Whimsical

Dust Flower

Michael Valerino, Duke University

Particulate matter (PM) refers to liquid or solid particles suspended in the atmosphere and comes from dust, combustion by-products, exhaust, fires, and even vegetation. When PM deposits on the surface of solar panels, it can reduce energy production by up to 40% resulting in ~10 to 50 billion dollars of annual losses globally. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of particles on the panel surfaces help us to better understand the sources impacting soiling. This piece of dust reminded our group of a flower, seemingly blooming out of an unearthly field. Even at this tiny scale, we can find familiarity.

Apply Now: 2020 Winter School on Emerging Technologies

8th Annual Winter School on Responsible Innovation and Social Studies of Emerging Technologies

January 3-10, 2020
Saguaro Lake Ranch (Mesa, Arizona)

The Winter School is designed to give junior scholars an introduction to and practical experience with methods and theory for better understanding the social dimensions of emerging technologies. The National Nanotechnology Coordinated Infrastructure (NNCI) Coordinating Office supports the Winter School, run by the School for the Future of Innovation in Society at Arizona State University .

Applicants should be advanced graduate students and/or recent PhDs with an expressed interest in studying emerging technologies. Applicants may come from any discipline, but priority will be given to those whose research focuses on societal questions. The program fees for accepted students will be covered by the NNCI including seven nights stay at the Saguaro Lake Ranch, all meals, and local transportation from Tempe, Arizona. Participants will be responsible for securing their own travel to Phoenix, Arizona.

Visit The Winter School website or review this flyer to learn more about the 2020 Winter School program and apply.

The deadline for applications has been extended until Tuesday, October 8, 2019.