In Situ Microscopy Congress

During this two day workshop, participants will learn about in situ electron microscopy and discuss liquid and gaseous experiments with some of the world’s leading researchers. Featuring the latest and greatest in situ solutions from Protochips and Thermo Fisher Scientific, numerous talks and hands-on demonstrations will show you how in situ techniques can accelerate your research, allowing you to discover more and publish faster.

All participants are encouraged to submit an abstract to be considered for an oral or poster presentation.

For more information and to register, please visit the event website.

Agenda

Session I: In Situ Liquid Cell TEM/STEM: Only a few decades ago, imaging liquids in the TEM was Only a few decades ago, imaging liquids in the TEM was thought to be impossible. Now, researchers are routinely using in situ liquid cell TEM (LCTEM) techniques to conduct experiments in realistic wet environments for applications in disciplines ranging from Material Science to Life Science. These symposia will highlight many aspects of LCTEM, from cutting-edge results and future research directions to new techniques and improved equipment designs. techniques and improved equipment designs. Topics to include: quantitative electrochemistry, liquid heating, EDS and EELS in liquids, innovation in liquid cells and holder designs, high resolution microscopy and spectroscopy, low dose imaging, nucleation and growth phenomenon, biological sample imaging, data analysis and interpretation.

Session II: In Situ Gas Cell TEM/STEM: The high-vacuum environment within electron microscopes significantly inhibits, or even completely removes, chemical sample dynamics that occur in realistic, extreme environments. With the advent of closed-cell holder designs it is now possible to precisely introduce high pressure gases to the sample environment. This allows researchers to mimic the hot, caustic environments relevant to real-world applications. These symposia will showcase new results and applications. These symposia will showcase new results and applications for environmental TEM techniques, as well as cover new equipment capabilities and in situ techniques related to the field. Topics to include: heterogeneous catalysis, corrosion in extreme environments, EDS and EELS in gas phase experiments, integrated Mass Spec RGA measurements, sample preparation and experimental methods, innovations in hardware and software, and approaches for data analysis and data management.

Monday, March 2nd

8:30-9:00 Registration and check-in

9:00-9:15 Opening remarks from AIF, Thermo Fisher Scientific, and Protochips

9:15–12:00 Technical Session: In Situ Gas Cell TEM/STEM

-Plenary Speaker: Xiaoqing Pan, University of California, Irvine

-This symposium will showcase new results and applications for environmental TEM techniques, as well as cover new equipment capabilities and in situ techniques related to the field.

12:00-1:00 Lunch – provided

1:00-4:00 Technical Session: In Situ Liquid Cell TEM/STEM

-Plenary Speaker: Haimei Zheng, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab

-This symposium will highlight many aspects of LCTEM, from cutting-edge results and future research directions to new techniques and improved equipment designs.

4:00-5:30 Poster Session and Cocktail Hour

Tuesday, March 3rd

9:30-11:00 Introductory Presentations by Thermo Fisher Scientific and Protochips

11:00-12:15 Coffee Break and Panel Discussion on In Situ TEM/STEM

12:15-1:15 Lunch – provided

1:15-2:45 Hands-on Product Demonstrations:

-Imaging liquid samples using the aberration corrected Titan 80-300 STEM

-Studying catalysts in atmospheric environments with the Talos F200X G2 TEM/STEM

-Capabilities and Applications using Focused Ion Beam (FIB) techniques

2:45-3:15 Coffee Break and Transition

3:15-4:45 Hands-on Product Demonstrations:

-Imaging liquid samples using the aberration corrected Titan 80-300 STEM

-Studying catalysts in atmospheric environments with the Talos F200X G2 TEM/STEM

-Capabilities and Applications using Focused Ion Beam (FIB) techniques

4:45-5:00 Wrap Up & Conclusions

Scanning Electron Microscopy Short Course

The goal for the day is to learn the basics of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) theory and SEM operation so that you can apply that knowledge to analyzing your own samples and/or understanding what SEM data means. Please note that a short course is designed to teach you how the technique works, the data that can be derived thereof, and what the generated data means. Training is designed to teach you the operational specifics of a particular instrument. Assuming that all is well you should be able to drive the Hitachi S-3200N SEM more or less independently by the end of the day. That said, it is not unusual for users to request additional training for a particular instrument.

We will start with an introduction lecture to SEM after which we will move to the lab. In the first lab, the student will observe a demonstration of SEM operation.  Then each of you will drive the microscope on a standard sample and we will explore changing instrument conditions and the resulting effect on the data. During this phase, we will also learn how to focus and correct astigmatism as well as how to properly set signal gain (contrast) and offset (brightness). After a break for lunch, there will be another lecture where we learn more about electron beam-sample interactions, detectors, how to pick imaging conditions, etc. Then we will go to the lab where you can apply what you have learned by imaging any sample you wish. You are welcome to bring a sample for this time or I can find one that is appropriate.

You should bring something to write with and on, a memory stick for the presentation and any data or other information that is electronic, and last but certainly not least, your brain. You can also bring a sample for hands-on time in the afternoon. We will take a short break for lunch, probably on the order of 30-45 minutes, so it might be smart to bring lunch with you.

This should be a relaxed and enjoyable day where you learn something fun and useful. Questions? Please contact Chuck Mooney at cbmooney@ncsu.edu. To maximize hands-on time, the class is limited to three students.

Registration costs: $50 for academic, government, and non-profit participants; $350 for industry participants

To register, add yourself to the short course through AIF’s lab management software, Mendix. Click here to watch a short video on how to register for a short course in Mendix. Select “Sign up for a Short Course.”

Carolina Science Symposium

The Carolina Science Symposium (CSS) is expected to draw about 100 participants, both locally and from the surrounding region. Topics in materials science, processing, characterization, and biomaterials will be presented by both invited and selected student contributors. A student poster session will be held, and 3-4 student contributed papers will be selected for 15 minute oral presentations. When registering, you will be asked to indicate whether the abstract should be considered for a poster or for a talk (eligible for an oral presentation). Over $2,000 will be awarded in prizes and drawings. The abstract deadline is November 1More information can be found here.

Invited Talks:


There will also be several free events leading up to the symposium. Please register for those that interest you!


Bio Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) Workshop – November 6, 2019


Bio-Indentation Workshop – November 6-7, 2019

NC State’s Analytical Instrumentation Facility (AIF) and Optics11 are hosting a workshop focused on mechanical characterization of biological and soft materials through nanoindentation. The workshop will include a brief background presentation as well as a demonstration of the Optics11 Piuma system. Attendees are encouraged to bring their own samples to try testing with the Piuma system as long as time permits.


Atom Probe Tomography – November 7, 2019

This technical seminar on Atom Probe Tomography for 3D Atomic-Scale Characterization will be hosted by CAMECA Instruments. Atom Probe Tomography (APT) is the highest special resolution analytical characterization technique with high efficiency single atom detection for quantitative atom scale 3D compositional analysis and elemental mapping of chemical heterogeneities. This talk will cover APT operational theory, an introduction to sample prep and data reconstruction, and an overview of various applications. A commercial cryo-UHV solution for FIB-APT specimen transfer will also be presented which expands the application space for APT to biological materials, hydrogen containing materials, and surfaces prone to rapid oxidation.

The seminar will begin at 11 am. Lunch will be provided


Bio-Microscopy Workshop – November 7, 2019 – 2:30-5 pm

Keyence is hosting a workshop focused on optical microscopy and fluorescence imaging of biological materials using their BZ-X800 microscope. Attendees are encouraged to bring their own samples to try imaging on the microscope.


CSS Professional Development Event – November 7, 2019 – 6-8 pm

The purpose of the event is to provide an additional professional development opportunity for attendees of the Carolina Science Symposium and foster collaboration between local universities. In addition, attendees can explore different types of careers and get advice and guidance from professionals in industry, government, academia, and non-profits. The event will last for ~2 hours with a mix of informal and formal networking. There will also be opportunities for one-on-one resume review and interview practice. Each attendee will receive a booklet with the names, contact information, and brief bio of participants. To register for the event, please fill out the Registration Form by Friday, November 1st. For questions/concerns, please contact Maude Cuchiara (maude_cuchiara@ncsu.edu).

Location: Tobacco Road Sports Cafe, Raleigh, NC

Bioindentation Workshop

NC State’s Analytical Instrumentation Facility (AIF) and Optics11 are hosting a workshop focused on mechanical characterization of biological and soft materials through nanoindentation. The workshop will include a brief background presentation as well as a demonstration of the Optics11 Piuma system. Attendees are encouraged to bring their own samples to try testing with the Piuma system as long as time permits.

Questions? Contact Phillip Strader (pmstrade@ncsu.edu)

The official start time is 10:00 am each day and the scheduled end is around 3:00 pm; however, attendees may come and go as they please during this time.

Scanning Electron Microscopy Short Course

The goal for the day is to learn the basics of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) theory and SEM operation so that you can apply that knowledge to analyzing your own samples and/or understanding what SEM data means. Please note that a short course is designed to teach you how the technique works, the data that can be derived thereof, and what the generated data means. Training is designed to teach you the operational specifics of a particular instrument. Assuming that all is well you should be able to drive the Hitachi S-3200N SEM more or less independently by the end of the day. That said, it is not unusual for users to request additional training for a particular instrument.

We will start with an introduction lecture to SEM after which we will move to the lab. In the first lab, the student will observe a demonstration of SEM operation.  Then each of you will drive the microscope on a standard sample and we will explore changing instrument conditions and the resulting effect on the data. During this phase, we will also learn how to focus and correct astigmatism as well as how to properly set signal gain (contrast) and offset (brightness). After a break for lunch, there will be another lecture where we learn more about electron beam-sample interactions, detectors, how to pick imaging conditions, etc. Then we will go to the lab where you can apply what you have learned by imaging any sample you wish. You are welcome to bring a sample for this time or I can find one that is appropriate.

You should bring something to write with and on, a memory stick for the presentation and any data or other information that is electronic, and last but certainly not least, your brain. You can also bring a sample for hands-on time in the afternoon. We will take a short break for lunch, probably on the order of 30-45 minutes, so it might be smart to bring lunch with you.

This should be a relaxed and enjoyable day where you learn something fun and useful. Questions? Please contact Chuck Mooney at cbmooney@ncsu.edu. To maximize hands-on time, the class is limited to three students.

Registration costs: $50 for academic, government, and non-profit participants; $350 for industry participants

To register, add yourself to the short course through AIF’s lab management software, Mendix. Click here to watch a short video on how to register for a short course in Mendix. Select “Sign up for a Short Course.”